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Motion Sickness

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Sea Sickness Facts

Motion Sickness

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Drug Free Remedies for Sea Sickness 

Our sea sickness products below fall into three categories, acupressure, homeopathic and herbal solutions to relieve sea sickness.  We have collected the most popular over the counter DRUG FREE solutions to relieve the symptoms related to sea sickness.  Both types of products are very effective drug free solution to reduce or eliminate sea sickness.  Just select the one that's most comfortable for you.  Since these products are all natural, more than one product can be used at the same time. Quick Reference Guide to Products        

Motion Sickness

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~   ~   ~   ~   Motion Sickness Facts  ~  Morning Sickness Site Sea Sickness Site  ~   ~   ~   ~ 

ACC-Stimulation

Herbal Solutions
Relief Band Voyager "New 2014" is an electronic watch device worn on the underside of the wrist.  It produces small electric pulses that stimulate the P6 Medium Nerve to relieve the nausea feeling associated with motion sickness. $129.00 Now $87.00
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Motion Eaze: Motion Eaze uses natural oils applied behind the ear to relieve the symptoms of sea sickness (40 applications). $ 14.99

 

 

 

 

Quease Ease: Aromatic Inhaler to relieve motion sickness.  At the first sign of queasiness, take off the cap and take a couple of deep breaths.  Use as often as necessary. $18.99

Acupressure Solutions

 

Magna Bands are adjustable acupressure bracelets with a 900 gauss magnetic button on each band.  The magnetic button stimulates the P6 acupressure point blocking nausea associated with sea sickness. $25.00

CanTravel is a Herbal Solution formulated into mini granules that you sprinkle on your tongue to relieve symptoms of motion sickness.  $22.95

 

SEA Bands are a pair of elastic wrist bands with a small button attached.  The button is positioned to stimulate the P6 acupressure point to relieve the nausea associated with sea sickness.  $9.95

Sailors Secret:Natural Premium Ginger capsules that reduce the symptoms due to sea sickness (36 capsules). $ 9.95

 

A special treat for the ginger lover.Gin Gins hard ginger candy is the natural way to relieve sea sickness.  Take them with you wherever you go and enjoy them whenever you feel nauseated. $4.49 

 

Queasy Pops: Queasy Pops are effective due to our special formulation of essential oils from natural herbs and aromatherapy.  Lick to relieve symptoms of sea sickness. $ 9.25

 

 

 

 

 

Some help full Tips to Avoid Sea Sickness while Boating Courtesy of: Goddess of the Sea Cruises

Avoiding Sea Sickness while Boating, is easier than you might think, especially on a sailboat, rather than a power boat.
Going fishing on a power boat involves long periods of drifting, and you are subjected to roll and pitch, the smell of bait, diesel or gas exhaust fumes, and possibly fuel vapors. None of these unpleasant items is present while sailing with us! Roll is the side to side movement, much more prevalent on a power boat while fishing, pitch is the fore and aft movement. While sailing, you will always be moving, driven by the wind, in unison with the tide and swells, a very natural feeling.
Because a sailboat has a keel, (a weighted fin projected down underwater, not visible while sailing), to oppose the force of the wind, roll is eliminated. And roll, is the biggest cause of motion sickness.

During the summer of 2003, Goddess of the Sea Cruises had 39 sailing reservations of 1 - 3 day sailing adventures. Not one person became sick, or ended their cruise with us early!

At first you feel that you may die, then you worry that you won't.

Nothing can spoil a day on the water like a case of motion sickness. When it happens at sea, we refer to it as mal de mer or sea sickness. Whatever you call it, it feels miserable when it besets us. This page then is dedicated to reducing or eliminating its severity or occurrence, or possibly preventing it altogether,  so we you may enjoy your sailing adventure.

What it is:

Motion sickness is a conflict between your senses. A fluid filled canal in your inner ear that controls your sense of balance tells your brain that your body is moving, while your eyes, looking into the cabin of the boat, tells your brain that you are not moving. That conflict can cause your body to be out of balance, and we know how the digestive system feels about that.

Here, we will concentrate on prevention. We will also look at the mind, body, spirit as a whole. A disharmony among them is what causes practically any illness.

If your systems are out of whack, your meals may come back.

Our metabolisms are nearly as unique as our personalities. Some preventatives will work for some people and not others. Others will work, though with varying degrees of effectiveness. You may have to do some trials and experimenting to find what works best for you. Nothing works the same for everybody.

There are two symptoms of seasickness, dizziness and nausea. Since a number of factors contribute to sea sickness and can trigger either or both parts, it makes sense to adhere to the following guidelines to reduce the chances of succumbing to it.

1. Get plenty of rest before you go out on the water. Weariness and exhaustion can make you more susceptible to other things that can bring on motion sickness. Do your gear preparation early the day before and take care of other business well before a proper bed time.

2. Do not eat greasy or acidic foods for several hours before your sailing adventure. This includes having coffee also. You don't want to have a lot of acid or heavy, slow to digest foods rolling around in your stomach while you are rolling around on the sea. Heavy, greasy foods like bacon and eggs, sausage, waffles or pancakes with syrup, alone or combined with acidic juices like orange juice, can wreak havoc on your system and end up recycled as lunch for fishes. Consider less acidic fruits (apples, bananas, pears, grapes, melons, etc.), breads (muffins, croissants, rolls), cereals and grains as alternatives. Milk, water, apple juice, cranberry juice and other low acid beverages are gentler alternatives to orange juice or grapefruit juice.Caffeinated beverages (including soft drinks) should be avoided as they are diuretics (make you urinate) which accelerates dehydration. The gas in carbonated beverages has negative responses in some, avoid them also.

3. Do not skip eating before sailing. An empty stomach can be almost as bad as one with the wrong types of food in it. Give your stomach acids something to work on other than your well-being. Give your stomach time to begin digesting you meal. Get up a little earlier if you must to eat relax and an hour or more before going out on the water.  Don't overeat and get bloated either.  Easy does it.

4. Drink plenty of water. Even partial dehydration lowers your body's resistance to the stressful factors caused by the boat ride. Take lots of water with you and drink often.

 
5. Do not drink alcoholic beverages for several hours. Alcohol tends to dehydrate the body. Its other symptoms are not desirable either. Alcohol can prevent the REM (Rapid Eye Movement) stage of sleep, the one in which you dream and your brain rests. You may feel tired and not alert from just a few drinks, two qualities not conducive to safe boating. If you do plan on drinking, make every third drink a glass of water. It will reduce dehydration and your chances for a hangover.

6. Avoid gasoline or diesel fumes. They can put you over the edge literally and figuratively. Stay out of direct sunlight as much as possible. Avoid becoming overheated and dehydrated.

7. Again, if possible, avoid the cabin and other enclosed spaces. Sometimes, a breezy spot in the sun may be preferable to a shady spot in a stuffy cabin.  The open air and ability to look out over the horizon are often more important than being in a shady spot, which can be stuffy and enclosed, limiting your view of the horizon and perhaps making you more prone to motion sickness.