Motion Sickness Facts

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Motion Facts and Information

  1. The standard advice for seasickness is to get up on deck where visual input agrees with vestibular input. Likewise, studies have shown that a child is far less likely to experience car sickness when in an elevated child seat that provides a good outside view.

  2. Techniques to reduce motion sickness, seasickness, and altitude sickness: Eat during the trip,

  3. To relieve motion sickness or sea sickness drink as little as possible.

  4. Morning Sickness Fact: Non-invasive and drug-free for expectant mothers to treat morning sickness.

  5. In a large study done in India, the prevalence of motion sickness was about 28%, and females were more susceptible (27%) were more susceptible than males (16.8%. Individuals with more active occupations are less susceptible in medical transport personnel, 46% of personnel reported nausea.

  6. What Can I Do for Motion Sickness: Avoid strong odors and spicy or greasy foods that do not agree with you (immediately before and during your travel).

  7. Most medications for motion sickness need to be taken at least 30 minutes before exposure to the activity that can cause the problem.

  8. Motion sickness, sea sickness and altitude sickness fact: according to a recent survey, 40% of adult travelers and 50% of children 2-12 experienced motion sickness during travel.

  9. Not everyone who suffers from motion sickness feels giddy or faint but a lot still suffer from this symptom.

  10. Different textbooks have different definitions, but basically motion sickness -- also called air sickness, sea sickness or car sickness -- is nausea and vomiting triggered by disturbance of the vestibular apparatus. The vestibular apparatus refers to the semicircular canals of the inner ear, which we use to maintain balance and sense orientation and movement.

 

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