Motion Sickness Facts

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"Motion Sickness - Just the Facts"

 

 

 

Motion Facts and Information

  1. One tablet of trip ease should be taken at the start of each trip, and one every hour while the problem persists.

  2. Morning Sickness Fact: Non-invasive and drug-free for expectant mothers to treat morning sickness.

  3. Motion sickness is common and normal. Nearly anyone can be made motion sick by an appropriate stimulus, except for individuals with no vestibular system.

  4. What Can I Do for Motion Sickness: Do not watch or talk to another traveler who is having motion sickness.

  5. Techniques to reduce motion sickness, seasickness, and altitude sickness: Position yourself for the least movement, The lesser the movement while traveling the better, this means asking the driver to slow down while in either a car or bus, sitting near the middle of an airplane or boat. Try and watch the horizon when you are on a boat and get plenty of fresh air even if itís very cold. When in a car try and sit in the front seat looking straight ahead, if you are old enough, drive the car.

  6. Morning Sickness Fact: Non-invasive and drug-free for expectant mothers to treat morning sickness.

  7. Acupressure wrist bands put pressure on the point called P6. Many people claim it works. It may in some individuals. How it works is unknown; however the Chinese state it works by balancing the ying and yang of your body.

  8. Motion sickness, sea sickness and altitude sickness fact: according to a recent survey, 40% of adult travelers and 50% of children 2-12 experienced motion sickness during travel.

  9. If you begin to feel sea sick, or motion sick; take slow, deep breaths

  10. Motion sickness, seasickness and altitude sickness happen when signals from the balance system of your body conflict with visual cues. For example, your body may sense rolling motions that you cannot see from inside a ship's cabin. Conversely, during a "virtual reality" simulation, your eyes perceive movement that your body does not experience. In addition, the structures of your inner ears can become unbalanced.

 

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